How Do I Talk to My Family About My Estate Plans?

If you’re in the midst of building an estate plan, you may be wondering how to properly involve your family members and loved ones in the process. How do you broach the subject tactfully and respectfully?

Pick the right time and setting.

First, make sure you schedule a family meeting with the proper timing. You shouldn’t bring up the subject of death too soon after major events like the death of a relative. You should also take care to choose an appropriate setting that offers the privacy and comfort you need to discuss sensitive issues.

Decide who to involve.

Ideally, you will be able to sit down with everyone you want to involve in your estate plans. If your loved ones live far away or your schedules don’t match up, see if you can have certain people attend via Skype or over the phone.

You should absolutely invite key people you intend to name in important roles like executor, trustee, or holder of power of attorney. Keep in mind that you don’t have to invite anyone out of politeness or courtesy. You must be 100% comfortable with the group you choose in the end.

Be honest about your wishes.

Once you have scheduled your conversation and invited your key family members, make sure you are prepared to speak frankly about your wishes. Although it’s an emotional subject, remember one thing: this meeting is meant for you to express your true wishes. Try not to worry about what others want or expect from you.

Involve a professional.

For additional support during your conversations with family, call an estate planning lawyer to attend the meeting with you. The attorney can clarify legal concepts and explain everyone’s role in terms you can all understand. Contact Estate & Long Term Care Group to get started.

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Written by ELTC Law Group

ELTC Law Group

We have been in business since 2007, helping the elderly and their families with a wide range of different issues including estate planning, asset preservation, long-term care, and post-death issues.